THE FOOD SEEN: Amy Chaplin, “At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen”

On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, Amy Chaplin grew up in the bush of Australia, 30 miles away from your closest supermarket. Her family built their own home, had a wood-burning stove, baked bread, kept bees, brewed ginger beer, made tofu, and ground wheat into flour, buying much of their dried goods in bulk … This sense of preparedness mixed with her mother’s affinity for entertaining, enlivened Amy’s spirit as a home cook. After years of working in restaurants, most notably the groundbreaking organic plant-based Angelica’s Kitchen in NYC, Amy returned to her own stove to create, At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen, a cookbook that sets you up for a healthy, happy lifestyle, allowing you to celebrate the art of eating well. From stocking a pantry full of whole grains, to introducing super foods to your meals, you can wake up to a bowl of black rice breakfast pudding, or awaken your tastebuds with miso soup with lemon, turmeric lemonade, pistachio pumpkin seed dukkah, and deeply satiate your soul with butternut squash lasagna with sage tofu ricotta, and heirloom bean bourguignon. Come feel the healing benefits of food.

***Feast your ears to THE FOOD SEEN on HeritageRadioNetwork.org every TUESDAY at 3PM EST!

THE FOOD SEEN: Peden + Munk, food photographers


*all photos by Peden + Munk

On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, food photographers Taylor Peden & Jen Munk have formed the photographic super group, Peden + Munk. Inspired by their mentor Paul Jasmin at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Taylor and Jen took to the streets of Los Angeles, with two models, and cues from Godard’s 1960’s film “Breathless”, marking the beginnings of a life filled with collaboration. Their focus on food came after a 3 day shoot at Blue Hill at Stone Barns, which opened up the industry to their creative eyes. They’ve since documented BBQ in Memphis, farming on Martha’s Vineyard, Rhum Agricole in the Caribbean, and many Michelin starred restaurants in California and beyond. Their images have donned the pages of Bon Appétit, the New York Times Magazine, and the recently released cookbook, A New Napa Cuisine with Chef Christopher Kostow of Meadowood in Napa. But what may excite them most, are the recipes they’ve learned through their travels.

***Feast your ears to THE FOOD SEEN on HeritageRadioNetwork.org every TUESDAY at 3PM EST!

THE FOOD SEEN: Charles Phan, “The Slanted Door: Modern Vietnamese Food”

On today’s THE FOOD SEEN, Charles Phan’s family left Vietnam just before the fall of Saigon to the Vietcong. Arriving to San Francisco in the mid 1970’s, Phan explored careers in pottery, architecture, but his family’s long history as excellent home cooks, manifest itself in 1995 when The Slanted Door opened it’s doors on Valencia Street in The Mission. The original iteration was going to be a rice crepe shop, instead Phan ventured past spring rolls and peanut sauce, introducing us to pho, rice porridges, clay pot cooking, and the wonders of fish sauce. In 2004 The Slanted Door moved to the Ferry Building, Phan won the James Beard Foundation Award for Best Chef California, and Vietnamese cuisine was a solid part of San Francisco’s culinary architecture. Last year Phan won the JBFA for Outsanding Restaurant, celebrating it’s 20th anniversary with the release of his new cookbook “The Slanted Door: Modern Vietnamese Food”. Học ăn, học nói, học gói, học mở.

***Feast your ears to THE FOOD SEEN on HeritageRadioNetwork.org every TUESDAY at 3PM EST!

THE FOOD SEEN: “The Modern Art Cookbook” with Mary Ann Caws

On today’s THE FOOD SEEN, Mary Ann Caws, a Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature, English, and French at the Graduate School of the City University of New York, takes an in-depth look at palates of famous artists throughout history. “The Modern Art Cookbook” mixes art with recipes, from Salvador Dali’s “Eggs on the Plate without the Plate” to a Picasso’s Omelette a L’Espagnole. The relationship between how Impressionists, Surrealists, and Futurists see food, interpreted through cooking, is wonderfully reflective of their personal styles. Imagine being studio with Paul Cezanne, snacking on his Anchoiade (anchovy spread), or trying Frida Kahlo’s Red Snapper, Veracruz Style, a bite of Monet’s Madeleines au Citron, or a slice of David Hockney’s Strawberry Cake. You can’t touch Andy Warhol’s “Campbell’s Soup Cans”, but you can eat Allen Ginsberg’s Borscht any day!

***Feast your ears to THE FOOD SEEN on HeritageRadioNetwork.org every TUESDAY at 3PM EST!

THE FOOD SEEN: Sean Brock, “HERITAGE”


*photo by Andrea Behrends

On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, we share the tradition of Southern storytelling with Sean Brock, chef of McCrady’s, Husk, Minero, in Charleston SC and Nashville TN. The son of a coal mining family in rural Wise County, Virginia, Sean never forgot his Appalachian upbringing while finding himself in the Lowcountry. It all started over a simple bowl of Hoppin’ John, and continued itself with a side of cornbread. These dishes are emblematic, not only in the South, put as far as West Africa for the Gullah people. To understand his roots better, Sean researched and traveled, in hopes of reviving ingredients, preserving said tradition, through seed saving, and working with Anson Mills and their Carolina gold rice. Sean celebrates this journey in his debut cookbook, HERITAGE, fittingly holding a handful of heirloom beans on the cover. Of course there’s BBQ, the smell of smoke, and a sip of whiskey or two, but it’s really about his manifesto, and finding yourself through cooking. Then the food has much meaning far deeper than fried chicken.

***Feast your ears to THE FOOD SEEN on HeritageRadioNetwork.org every TUESDAY at 3PM EST!

THE FOOD SEEN: Renee Erickson, “A Boat, A Whale & A Walrus”


*photo by Jim Henkens

On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, it’s not all rain and fog in Seattle when Renee Erickson of Ballard’s beloved The Walrus and the Carpenter comes to us with her book of occasional menus, “A Boat, A Whale & A Walrus”. From crabbing as a child, to in the Puget Sound, to picking wild blackberries for jamming all along the Pacific Northwest, it was actually an education to printmaking and painting at the University of Washington, that had a profound effect on Renee’s opportune life. Luck struck first at Boat Street Cafe, and now finds itself next to the wood fire ovens of The Whale Wins. Fancying fishermen as friends and patrons, Renee serves a spread of herring butter on toast, grills Hama Hama oysters from the Olympic Peninsula, and eats spot prawns raw on Lummi Island, sharing these mouthwatering stories along the way. Hey, she may even invite you to her birthday party, or at least help you find a boat.

***Feast your ears to THE FOOD SEEN on HeritageRadioNetwork.org every TUESDAY at 3PM EST!

THE FOOD SEEN: Francis Mallmann, ON FIRE


*photo by Peter Buchanan-Smith

On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, the master of live fire cooking, Francis Mallman, is ON FIRE! Well, not literally, but it’s the title of his new book, Mallman on Fire, a follow up to his international hit, Seven Fires: Grilling the Argentine Way. A self-proclaimed son of Patagonia, Francis embodies the spirit of South America’s finest wood fire cooks, like the indigenous Mapuches, and gauchos on the range. For this book, Francis traveled the world, from Brooklyn to Paris, with a an array of portable chapas (griddles/planchas) and parillas (grills), even cooking infiernillo (between two fires). We’ll talk about wood, which ones to use, how to control their flame, turn them into charcoal, and use the ashes and embers (rescoldo). Recipes such as, Cowboy Ribeyes, Potato and Chicken Galette, Charred Herb Salsa (which is not chimichurri), Coal Burnt Pimento Oil, Tuna Churrasco and Avocado Sandwiches … are all about patience, enjoying conversation, and LOVE.

***Feast your ears to THE FOOD SEEN on HeritageRadioNetwork.org every TUESDAY at 3PM EST!

THE FOOD SEEN: Patti Page, “You Can’t Judge A Cookie By Its Cutter”


*photo by Jennifer Causey

On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, those same old holiday cookies are transformed by Patti Page of Baked Ideas. In her new book, “You Can’t Judge A Cookie By Its Cutter”, Patti uses her art school background, to visualize everyday confections outside the cookie box. From the early days of her SoHo loft, where she sold paintings to galleries and bite-sized walnut pies to Dean & DeLuca, to molding her own aluminum and copper cutters, Patti’s reimagined Santa head turning into turkeys, football helmet as elephants, Texas as a Chinese takeout boxes with chopsticks … and of course, being in NYC, has baked more her fair share of taxis.

***Feast your ears to THE FOOD SEEN on HeritageRadioNetwork.org every TUESDAY at 3PM EST!

THE FOOD SEEN: The Cuban Table with Ana Sofia Pelaez & Ellen Silverman

On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, we travel to the Caribbean island of Cuba, where amid embargoes and defections, much of the nation’s food history has been a mystery outside of it’s own country. Writer Ana Sofia Pelaez and photographer Ellen Silverman, made it their mission to bring to light the rich cultural cuisine found in the kitchens of Cuba, from Havana nights to Medianoches (sandwiches). Their book, The Cuban Table, is highlighted by pastelitos de queso y guayaba, empanaditas de chorizo, arroz y frijoles, ropa vieja (“old clothes”), and flan de leche. For these culinary treasures, we raise our Mojitos and Cuba Libres, to liberating more than just the eponymous Cubano.

The Cuban Table

***Feast your ears to THE FOOD SEEN on HeritageRadioNetwork.org every TUESDAY at 3PM EST!

THE FOOD SEEN: “North: The New Nordic Cuisine of Iceland” with Gunnar Karl Gíslason


*photos by Evan Sung

On today’s episode of THE FOOD SEEN, Gunnar Karl Gíslason explains the geothermal power of Iceland, through it’s culture and cuisine. In his cookbook, “North: The New Nordic Cuisine of Iceland”, Gunnar travels among the country’s many geysers and fjords, to find a cast of purveyors from bacalao fishermen to Artic char smokers, rúgbrauð (rye bread) bakers to seabird egg collectors, harðfiskur (fish) driers to dulse harvesters, and don’t forget the hákarl (rotten shark). When he opened Dill Restaurant (Reykjavik) in 2009, it was amid the largest universal banking collapse. That didn’t stop this viking, nor his country, from showing the world what Iceland has to offer. Skál!

***Feast your ears to THE FOOD SEEN on HeritageRadioNetwork.org every TUESDAY at 3PM EST!